.

DIY Ducati Cam Belt Service ?

SORRY NO

Not for most people anyhow.

There are even some "Ducati trained " mechanics out there who have managed to get it wrong ( believe me I have had the pleasure of employing them in the past ).
Nothing is difficult when you know how but it seems to me that there are too many people who think they know how because they simply wont admit ( I think its called delusion in medical circles or simply " I will lie to get a wage in others ) they are simply chancers.

Either way if you want to do it at home you will need

1. A proper non delusional understanding of how engines / cambelts work. If you do not stop reading now.
2. As you have not done this before you will need the correct manual ( I can not recommend the Ducati one really its OK but when the main text gives a bolt one name and then refers you to another section for the torque setting which uses another name ....).
3. 2 of the correct cam wheel locking tools. If you do not know what thees are stop reading now.
4. The crankshaft locking tool. Ditto.
5. The castellated socket to turn the crank ( no you cant do it by spinning the wheel in gear ).
6. An accurate ( electronic ) torque wrench.
7. The Ducati electronic tension tester ( it measures the tension by the vibration of the belt ).You can do it by hand if you have been doing for 20 years but if you have just got tooled up from B and Q you cant.
8. The correct Torx driver to loosen the cam belt wheels on the cam ( the setting in the factory may not work for the belts you have. Not all belts are the same . If you don't understand this concept your probably a reasonable person. I still cant understand why time slows down the closer you get to the speed of light or for that matter why time speeds up the more you drink.
9. Nerves of steel for the start up.

Or however ( as you will have to buy the belts anyhow ) why not pay your local specialist ( not scooter dealer ) to do it  . If the bike is on the bench anyhow you should only be looking at 2 hours labour max.If you want to do it yourself  you must have the tools but the payback on doing your own will take longer your will to survive. Some years ago a guy who specialised in Landrovers told me he took his car ( Ford I think ) to his local Ford dealer , it simply wasn't worth aggro with all the special tools etc you needed.

Belt services are normally every 2 years  but they are also mileage related ie about 12k and even if you dont think the belts need changing , the tensioners are not automatic ie you must set them by hand. For what its worth  I would have them checked every year as part of the service whilst the bike is on the bench its about an hours labour for a lot of piece of mind.

Ducati 1098s Clutch Service

The first signs of spring are not bluebells poking out or indeed the wife hinting at booking a holiday but rather  the sudden increase in the demand for motorcycle batteries especially for the "only in the sun brigade " . Dont get me wrong why ride a super exotic 1098s in the freezing wet salt infested climes of the British winter . I wouldn't , theres more to life .

But

Whilst keeping your tootsies warm inside best suggest to the wife its also the best place for for your real love of your life . Maybe the bedroom is a bit too close to home but indoors is certainly  the best place for your Italian Stallion.

Please peruse the following pics


A good customer gave us the normal flat battery call soon sorted with Yuasa's  best but upon embarking on the mandatory test ride for any bike that comes through the workshop ( you would be surprised how many bikes have major work and are not tested ). It was quite clear that the bike was not going anywhere as the clucth was fully locked up.

It looks like the local feline society had been using this particular bike as the local latrine but as you may appreciate none of the parts in a Ducati dry clutch are made to withstand the weather.

They are in fact made to take a lunatic round a race track for 20 minutes and little else. Sure they work for road use but at the end of the day the dry clutch was very much a racing development to coax a few more horses to the back wheel. So if you want to own what used to be called a "race rep" back in the 80's please don't leave it the rain or for cats to piddle on.

The Cure ?

Well Sir ( the Ducati dealer would say ) you will need a new clutch ( basket and hubs ) . Well Sir I would say about an hour on a wire wheel would cure that and it did. The pics do look bad I agree and most of the plates took some effort to prise apart but they cleaned up fairly well and as the customers name wasn't Mr Rossi. 2 hours labour versus 600 odd pounds plus labour  didn't cause too much consternation.

Next please !

Service Your Motorcycle and live Part 3

In part 2 I was mentioning levers . There are a lot of smaller ie 125 cc bikes still running on front ( and rear ) drum brakes. Cables don't last forever especially if you have lost your oil can. Drum brake pivots ect also need lubrication . OK there are cables now with nylon coating but these need inspecting . All of this will happen during a proper service. Imagine the terror of your front brake failing down a steep hill with a set of lights at the bottom . Its called Muswell Hill in my case and whilst I was on a bicycle it still had cable operated brakes and the surprise was all the greater. Fortunately the rear brake did work but surprise surprise  it also snapped a week later somewhat sooner than I had expected which left me with no brakes ! ( but not on Muswell Hill ). The point here is preventative maintenance . there are some items you simply should not wait for failure of ( would you ride your tyres till they burst ? ) .

 Clutch cable . well if that went it would simply be a chore getting home.
Ever ridden a bike with no clutch ? Tried it a few months back  in fact but managed to get home with the judicious use of neutral and some well timed traffic light approaches got me most of the way plus plenty of leg paddling and gear crunching but safe it was not ( turned out it was a seized release bearing ( maintenance ! )).

Head bearings ? pretty foolproof really but let them run dry which they will ( even with the nice rubber dust cover which will perish ) and you are looking at a MoT failure and 60 odd pounds for a new set on top of the labour which is a lot more to replace than just a grease up.

Petrol tank filler seal  - we had a Ducati 848 in 2 years ago that had gone up in smoke. The owner claimed he simply started it and whoomph . The petrol had to come from somewhere and the vents on the 848 ,1098 and 1198 all take a route close to the front exhaust pipe even closer if not refitted properly after that life saving service. Now Im not claiming that there is much chance of your bike turning into a ball of fire on the motorway ( whats that film again ? ) but the fuel cap seal is a MoT item and who wants to walk into any social gathering with a strange smell of petrol eminating from their groin.

Throttle cables and throttle bodies / carbs - get stuck on full power for a split second when you are not expecting it and anything nasty can happen. A working kill switch is handy but as soon as something unexpected happens the human brain can do all sorts of strange things ( like grab the front  brake ). One item on the MoT test is to go from full lock to lock with the engine at idle. If the speed picks up its a fail and there is a reason for it ie safety. The fitting of new cables or brake hoses ( or head bearings can result in such problems if your not careful ).

Engine - pretty obvious really , a seized engine ( they tend to like to seize when being thrashed ie going too fast ) will lock your back wheel. Would you hit your rear brakes going round a corner  at 80 ? Most engines will give you some warning most of the time but not all of the time and its just that tiny of chances Mr Reaper is hanging around for ( who's thinking of that Monty Python sketch ?? ).

Electrics - Not much work here for the service man and his oily rag but whilst most of us may be used to street lighting there are plenty of places out of town where a loss of lights could be very tricky. If your having problems with intermittent faults get it checked out. Theres no law stopping you having your wiring loom overhauled EH ?? Yes try undoing all of the connectors on your loom ( not all at the same time and you will find some corroded ones ( even on a 3 year old bike ) a dab of WD40 wont do any harm. I've seen plenty of bikes ( we don't all have sealed gel batteries you know ) with half filled corroded terminal batteries and a "it wont start" mutter emanating from its owner too scared to remove his helmet as he knows he will be asked when the bike was last serviced ( if ever ).

Rivington Barn 3rd June 2012

Rivington Barn - 3rd June 2012

The Ducati Roadshow will again be travelling the length and breadth of the country to bring the Ducati UK demonstrator fleet to a venue near you in 2012.

The Ducati UK event truck and demonstrator fleet of 12 bikes and 8 display bikes have proved popular attractions over the last few years with more dates than ever added to this year’s roadshow tour.

The demonstrator fleet showcases the 2012 range including the stunning 1199 Panigale. Although the 1199 Panigale has grabbed all the attention there's a wide variety of bikes in the Ducati range to test. The Diavel is a must to test ride appealing to all types of riders, once ridden many riders will fall for the Diavel’s versatility and performance, whilst the Multistrada is a combination of touring and sporting abilities.

In addition to these popular bikes, 2012 sees the introduction of the Streetfighter 848, which will be available to test alongside, Monster 696, 796, 1100 Evo, Hypermotard 796 and 1100 Evo, 848 Evo, 1199 Panigale, Diavel and Multistrada.

To take a test ride at any of this event, riders must have a valid motorcycle licence (both parts required) and appropriate clothing and safety gear.

Our staff will be on hand to give expert technical and service advice and trained riders will there to guide all test rides.

Call us for more information!

Rivington Barn 3rd June 2012

Rivington Barn - 3rd June 2012

The Ducati Roadshow will again be travelling the length and breadth of the country to bring the Ducati UK demonstrator fleet to a venue near you in 2012.

The Ducati UK event truck and demonstrator fleet of 12 bikes and 8 display bikes have proved popular attractions over the last few years with more dates than ever added to this year’s roadshow tour.

The demonstrator fleet showcases the 2012 range including the stunning 1199 Panigale. Although the 1199 Panigale has grabbed all the attention there's a wide variety of bikes in the Ducati range to test. The Diavel is a must to test ride appealing to all types of riders, once ridden many riders will fall for the Diavel’s versatility and performance, whilst the Multistrada is a combination of touring and sporting abilities.

In addition to these popular bikes, 2012 sees the introduction of the Streetfighter 848, which will be available to test alongside, Monster 696, 796, 1100 Evo, Hypermotard 796 and 1100 Evo, 848 Evo, 1199 Panigale, Diavel and Multistrada.

To take a test ride at any of this event, riders must have a valid motorcycle licence (both parts required) and appropriate clothing and safety gear.

Our staff will be on hand to give expert technical and service advice and trained riders will there to guide all test rides.

Call us for more information!

The Panigale is in the building - Ben and Adam are just giving it a quick PDI and Polish ready for her grand unveiling tomorrow at our Launch! - Dont forget to come and join us 5.00pm to 7.30pm Wednesday 28th March.

The Panigale is in the building - Ben and Adam are just giving it a quick PDI and Polish ready for her grand unveiling tomorrow at our Launch! - Dont forget to come and join us 5.00pm to 7.30pm Wednesday 28th March.

Motorcycle Mots In Hertfordshire

A few years back before we opened our MoT bay most people wanting a service also needed a MoT so the for the miserly sum of the cost of a MoT we would load the bike into a van and the mechanic would drive off to the local motorcycle MoT and come back some 2 hours later ! Ever been for a motorcycle MoT which was booked in and stood around for an hour ? We were spending more time getting the MoT than we were servicing the bike. A good friend of mine also in the trade reckoned a motorcycle MoT bay would be a great addition to his income flow . " You don't need to service your bike but you have to MoT it " it he would remind me.

And so the MoT installer was summoned and off I went to do my motorcycle MoT course in sunny Watford. The guy running the course was a nice chap and indeed very patient and to my surprise most of the course was general information on MoT laws and the procedures surrounding the test and of course how to use the VOSA computer. It was assumed everyone taking the course did know enough about motorbike mechanics ( you needed to have 4 years experience in a workshop to qualify for the course ) so there was not much technical to learn.
The MoT computer is pretty much like any other but there is a lot more to doing a MoT in terms of admin.
The cost of the MoT is £29.50 ( this is a recommended figure but you can charge whatever you want in fact ).
The grand finale of the course was a mock test on a Chinese 125 where we all looked at the bike and pointed out he various faults. Suffice to say everyone passed the test.
The real knee trembler came when "the man from VOSA " came round to witness you doing a mock test.
The trick here was to choose a fairly new bike as this would not have any faults and to have given it a good look but as with all things with a bit of preparation most things are easy.

Problem is when things get slower most motorbike shops have the bright idea of opening a MoT bay but the numbers are starting to work. We have now done enough Mots to have paid for for the equipment and the saving in time has been immense. Quite frankly I can't see the point in servicing bikes and not offering MoTs given the inconvenience to the customer and yourself . I can also say expecting a lot of work in via MoT fails is not going to happen . The odd thing is most bikes pass an MoT especially the larger ones having been well looked after over the years. Having a customer looking round your shop for half an hour however is always handy !

Devils Bridge Store Rideout - March 25th



We had a superb rideout up to Devils Bridge this afternoon, after the store closed, and met up with our friends - DOC Cumbria, who had valiantly turned out, despite raging hang overs, after having entertained DOC M Batallion last night!!

We had a fantastic run up, in glorious weather on some superb roads - add in to the mix, an extra of daylight and some glorious iconic italian motorcycles and it really was superb....!!

We do hope you'll come and join us for the next one.

Devils Bridge Store Rideout - March 25th



We had a superb rideout up to Devils Bridge this afternoon, after the store closed, and met up with our friends - DOC Cumbria, who had valiantly turned out, despite raging hang overs, after having entertained DOC M Batallion last night!!

We had a fantastic run up, in glorious weather on some superb roads - add in to the mix, an extra of daylight and some glorious iconic italian motorcycles and it really was superb....!!

We do hope you'll come and join us for the next one.

Want to be a motorcycle Mechanic ?


I have found it rather pleasant writing articles for my blog / website and hope to do a few a week. I have been working on motorbikes and engines in general for nearly forty years and for the past five years I have been working in my own bike shop Hertfordshire Superbike Centre. I have no formal qualifications ( other than a BSc Honours degree in another subject ) in motorcycle mechanics and whilst researching what qualifications were out there I found this article on an American site. It pretty much sums up what its like ( being a mechanic ) sometimes ie sheer panic followed by a great sense of satisfaction having solved a problem with a motorbike.
There are no manuals on how to remove a fairing after the well nut ( these are rubber grommets with a brass insert on the inner part of a fairing. They work well until the fairing screw corrodes but as the rubber grommet has a limited purchase on the fairing it just spins.You can spend half an hour getting round this problem. All manuals are written in the factory based on the assumption the product is perfect and that the reader was involved in the design and production of the vehicle from day one not to mention they are double jointed , have limitless time and own pretty much every tool ever manufactured.
I am currently attempting to replace the cam belt on a MGF. "rotate the engine until the marker on the crank aligns with top dead centre " Sorry sir corrosion has obliterated the timing mark ! The solution is to find tdc. The manual does not tell you how to do that but I have a dial gauge and just know how to do it ( used to do a bit of 2 stroke tuning ).


THIS IS THE ARTICLE

I've been a bike mechanic for around 20 years. The first thing you must have is a comprehensive set of tools, then a good general mechanical aptitude. In that order. Most shop owners seem to think that if you hand someone a great set of tools, they're magically a mechanic. So use that to your advantage. You can get a killer stainless steel, ball-bearing drawer two-cabinet toolbox from Sam's Wholesale Club for around $600. The best way "in" to a dealership mechanic slot is to get to know a senior mechanic at the shop where you want to work. You tread a fine line between being an interested novice and a goofball wannabe, so you have to watch your approach.

Years ago, I told the lead tech at Honda Central that I was going to drive a truck for two years to save up tuition for MMI (or AMI) so that I could come apply for a job and he said, "ah hail, I'll train you. When can you start?" I THOUGHT I had "tools" but they fit in a tackle box. Boy did I ever find out. You have to have your own- if you get a job, then start borrowing tools from your coworkers- get ready to start looking for another job.

The biggest thing is that, no matter how much you read, nothing replaces doing it for real. I can read "remove swingarm" in a BMW manual, but DOING it takes a 42mm socket, a heat gun, and two hours of high-pressure labor. Not to mention the fact that putting it back together will take twice as long, and you run the risk of ruining the whole thing if you screw up. As a professional mechanic, you will learn something new at LEAST once per hour, for the rest of your career. It's amazing. You can't rush the experience, so you just start at the bottom (probably fixing 2-strokes or smaller ATVs, possibly mounting tires) then you just keep easing into more complex stuff. The first time you get turned loose on a big touring bike with an intermittent electrical problem, you think "what have I gotten myself into?" but just bang it out the best you can.

I got lucky that my first "trainer" eased me into the craft. At the second dealership I went to, they slapped me with a Yamaha Venture Royale with air forks that needed new steering head bearings. DUDE I couldn't even get the thing on my lift. rrrrr I don't miss those days- I stressed out every single day for two years because every single bike I got was a different make or model, and the problem it had was a brand new problem I'd never seen. It's absolutely staggering how many things can go wrong, and management expects you to just dive right in and make their dreams come true.

If you're gonna do it, more power to you. Hang in there. Prepare yourself for spending uncomfortable amounts of your paycheck buying tools. After 20 years, I still have to buy a tool per week. It sucks. Shoot, today we MADE a 41mm split fork seal driver- no time to wait for Motion Pro to ship us one. It's stuff like that you learn to hate, but you love it, too. Weird.

PS I bought the full set of seal drivers a while back. You dont use them often but boy are they handy when you do need them.

How To Make a Small Fortune in Motorcycles



Start with a large one !

Funny but true. My accountant told me the motor trade is one of the hardest businesses to make profit in and manage.
The truth is however the motorcycle business is shrinking do we all know why ? I’ll give into my thoughts on the matter.
The stack them high approach simply does not work anymore ask Mr White. It was once said that if they filled the tank up they would lose money on the sale well they must have put just a little too much in lately. The motorcycle business used to be dominated by hard working individuals with a love for motorcycles. Then it seemed in the late 70”s / 80’s the men in suits with our pensions to invest wanted a piece of the action just as cars became a cheaper safer more reliable means of transport ( ok slower at times ) and so the motorcycles allure of cheap motoring waned and motorcycles became the fast and thrilling toys they are so good at being and so they should be ( as long as you maintain them and do a few track days to really find out how to ride safely ( a future article )).

Hang on !

I forgot to mention scooters , about the biggest selling market now. Well hey ho how the clock has come full circle. Cheap transport for the masses ? That’s where the Ducati brothers started with the 50cc bolt on engine they produced for bicycles after the war and I don’t mean the Falklands ! They sell in large numbers to people who want to get to work cheaply and who can forgo the use of their Blackberrys on the train so they can get in quicker to do their emails with a cup of tea (they put stuff in the water to make you work longer you know )

So scooters aside bikes are becoming a pleasure activity and why not . The most fun I have ever had on a motorcycle was travelling across Africa on a Honda 125 bush bike. Ok it wasn’t fun when I broke a hand and a wrist ( Im afraid not on the same side ) and had to ride for a few hours but fun none the less ( apart from after the operation or more accurately when I woke up thinking someone was slamming my hand in the door )

Motorised bicycles  are fun and exciting even my old 1926 hand change motorcycle is fun. My electric scooter is fun .That’s why motorbikes will grow in popularity again.

Back to the small fortune.
Its quite simple . Man loves bikes man opens motorbike shop. Man loves bikes so goes to shop to buy a bike and then has his bike serviced etc etc.
Man invents computer , internet  and Ebay.
Man with van sells bikes from home via ebay and man with shop ( which means rates , rent , insurance , staff ,van , NI payments , gas , electricity , internet ) ie loads of bill which you then need a bookkeeper to keep track of and an accountant to keep an eye on it all and there you go a bottom line figure with a big fat negative sign at the beginning !
“How much mate ? I can get it for half the price on Ebay “
Sound familiar well I’ve actually said it myself when buying parts from a Fiat dealership for the shop van.
The solution is simple and after 5 hard years work it’s where I am heading.

1.   Servicing but with a smile and with information and help given to customers from the mechanic rather than a pretty lady at the front desk who you would rather ask out than tell you cant afford the bill ( why do you think they are there ? )



2.   Ever been to a bike shop looking for a M18 1.25 pitch blanking plug for your new exhausts that don have a lamda sensor to plug in ? The reply would be ??
Happened to me last summer. The guy needed to get away for a trip and had to fit the pipes so I made him 2 plugs on my lathe OK not cheap but most shops would try and pass you on to a supplier in America.

3.   Specialize . I’ve always liked building machinery and bikes in particular so I’m pushing back into that market. Nothing is more exciting  than actually making a new motorbike. OK I’m not digging up the ore and smelting it  but just like scooters ( started in the 50’s / 60’s ) the CafĂ© racers are back and I like the look of them. Watch this space.

4.   Employ the right staff. When things were good and credit was more plentiful ( but not as cheap ) pretty much anybody who was sober could sell stuff. These days the ability to think and understand the concept of customer service = you might get paid this month comes in very handy. A “mechanic” using a air wrench to get a 13mm head bolt old is not thinking straight.

5.   Don’t consider a 38 hour week as knocking yourself out. As far as I am concerned we are in the service sector. If you want to get and retain customers you need to provide a flexible and quality service.

6.   Quality not quantity. There are shops who specialize in cheap tyres and cheap servicing and there always will be as there is a demand for it. Stick to your market sector and what you are best set up to do.

7.   Be realistic. If its not working now it probably wont work unless you make some major changes from the top to the bottom.



Well there’s my view on the market, there will always be a motorcycle market and I think the future is good as long as the old supply chain adapts to th 

Store Rideout - The Charity Easter Egg Run

We will be joining our friends on the Wirral for the annual Easter Egg Run on the 1st April (honest that is the date!).

Its always a fun day and its for a great cause.

Meet at the Store at 9.00am prompt - all welcome and we'd love to see you.

Store Rideout - The Charity Easter Egg Run

We will be joining our friends on the Wirral for the annual Easter Egg Run on the 1st April (honest that is the date!).

Its always a fun day and its for a great cause.

Meet at the Store at 9.00am prompt - all welcome and we'd love to see you.

Meek Mill - Lean Wit It (Official Video)

Curren$y - Livin



This is a video for the track Livin' from Curren$y's newest EP #Here. 

“Neighborhood Watch” Movie Trailer


If this is just half as good as the movie's trailer, then this is going to be very funny! Check this out.

Rihanna for Armani Underwear Commercial

Devils Bridge Store Rideout

At a loose end on the 25th March ?? We have the perfect solution.... enjoy the sunshine in the Afternoon on your Duke, and join Martin our Sales Manager for a rideout up to Devils Bridge and meet up with DOC Cumbria - we're leaving straight after the store closes at 4.00pm - and you are welcome to attend!

Devils Bridge Store Rideout

At a loose end on the 25th March ?? We have the perfect solution.... enjoy the sunshine in the Afternoon on your Duke, and join Martin our Sales Manager for a rideout up to Devils Bridge and meet up with DOC Cumbria - we're leaving straight after the store closes at 4.00pm - and you are welcome to attend!

Motorcyle MoT's North london / Herts



Since I was a kid getting a MoT on my sloped as it was then was always a time of trepidation worry and sometimes the crushing news of looming expenditure which the pocket money simply could not cover. I remember it as if yesterday when my Mobylette moped failed its MoT at Stamford Motorcycles in the Summer of 1976. “ Sorry Sir its failed “.
Failed ? but its only a minor chip in the headlight which was no more powerfull that the torch on my I phone ! What difference would a small chip make ?? My father came to the rescue being one of those men who could  mend most things with a bit of skill and effort ( try saying that in a modern workshop and you will get little more than the dumb monkey face and a request for the part number ! ) Anyhow some Airfix glues and a bit of filing later the MoT was passed and carefree motoring of up to 35mph ( downhill ) on a thimble of fuel was mine again .
Fast forward 34 years and I was the proud owner of a VOSA ID card clearly stating I was an authorized examiner with my very own MoT bay in my own shop of Hertfordshire Superbikes ( H.S.B.C for short ) Power beyond compare the ability to grant the freedom of the road or to put on the white coat gloomy face and low tone of a judge reaching for the black cap. Funny thing however is that most bikes do pass the MoT but imagine this from the MoT examiner when I went to do the 2 day course to get my testers stamp of approval.
“Imagine a new motorcycle is at this level “ and he put his hand at head level.
“Imagine this is scrap “ and his hand goes down to his hip.
“This is the level of the MoT “ and his hand moved just above his hip.
The MoT test is not there to give your motorcycle a safety stamp for the next 12 months. It is there to prove that at the time of the test it met certain minimum requirements and only certain ones.
Your bike can pass a MoT with a flat tyre ! Very dangerous to ride but not on the list of items tested. The tester can refuse to test it if he thinks the test may damage the motorcycle or the testing equipment. He can make it an advisory but that’s all.
You don’t need lights or indeed a speedo.
Your wheel bearings can have play in them but they have to be “excessively worn “ to fail the MoT.
Excessively ? Well  the examiner made this point.
“if you think the wheel is about to drop of it’s a fail. If you even stop to consider it then it’s a pass”
Personally I would be a bit harsher and whilst I would accept some slight play ( every bearing has slight play anyhow and actually needs it ) but anymore and I would consider that excessive.
Minimum tread ? 1mm sir but if your riding a under 50cc machine you just need to be able to see the tread pattern all the way round.
There are many other oddities within the testers guide some of which eminate from the very early days of motoring but one thing is for sure , the motorcycle MoT is going to get tougher but a well maintained ie properly serviced motorcycle will pass the MoT if it does not its probably a death trap and you should be thankful someone has pointed out its shortcomings. If you think your pride and joy should have passed and it did not then you can appeal . The vast majority of appeals for a non pass are declined. The majority of appeals are in fact for passes when Mr Ebayer has got a MoT on a bike then taken it home and swapped all the decent bits ie brake pads, tyres, forks , etc etc.
And would I have passed my Mobylette well yes I would , there was no material effect on the light output of the headlamp.

Service your motorcycle and live part 2

I had a very nice 1098S in a few day ago. They are a great bike everything  the Italians do the best . Fast great handling and so nice to look at.
Fork seals were leaking ( both at the same time ! ) but not down to Ducati as they are Ohlins. Anyhow , had the seals been changed as per my last article the owner would have saved himself the cost of 2 new sets of brake pads and his old ones were pretty new !
A service however is also a general inspection and I found the alarm flashing led  "pod" ( a 1 inch round plastic housing about 5mm thick ( mixing units I know ) had lost its grip and had been given the kiss of death in the lock stop of the bottom yolk. Very very dangerous especially if it had fallen longways in on a tightish bend. A good heave on the bars may have crushed it out of the way but for most people this immediate change in the norm of " push the bars and it will turn " could have brought about sheer panic ie an exit to the hedge or worse the oncoming traffic.
This sort of thing should be picked up in a normal service but a more general inspection every time you ride is a worthy task.
Moving up to the headlight area , does your dip beam work ?. If your used to riding in town and find yourself one eve on an unfamiliar country road faced with an oncoming car full fog lights blaring at you . You dip your beam it passes and nothing ! Happened to me once.
Bulbs do not last forever so if your headlight bulb has been giving you good service for years maybe its worth changing for a new one or better still a upgraded HED type.
When was the last time you oiled you levers ?
Part of a proper service and not so much of a safety issue in the short term but ever wondered why there are steam engines stil running from 100 years ago ?
They had there moving parts oiled every day.
Most people seem to think they only need to oil/grease/chainlube the chain. Oil is the lifeblood of any mechanical machine it is a must for any moving parts and on a regular basis. Levers are greased at the factory but this will only last for so long. Oiled/ greased lever bushes work better feel better and last longer. A worn brake lever will never work as well as a well maintained one.

Ducati Servicing in London ?

Its a big place London but somewhat short of authorised Ducati dealerships as most Ducati owners will know. Not surprising really as large cities are not the most friendly places for such thoroughbred machines.
Its a bit like trying to keep a racehorse in town . Possible if you live in Chelsea barracks and work for the Queen but otherwise hard work unless you have money and plenty of it . Not that Ducati ownership is that expensive. Ducati have come a long way in ridding themselves of the stigmas from the 70's with their poor reliability and build quality typical of automotive products in general from Italy during that time ( the UK bike market had kicked the chair from under it a bit sooner ) and now most European brands are up there with the best in the world ( BMW never slipped really ).
So where do you get your Ducati serviced at a reasonable cost ?
Well Ill be honest having been a Ducati dealer for 4 years and having struggled to make it work I now run  ( and own (still ))  Hertfordshire Superbike Centre ( H.S.B.C ? ) and we are an independent Ducati specialist but also more than willing to service and repair any make and in my view the more experience you have of other brands the better you are at problem solving.
We have all the special tools etc but as with all other independents have the flexibility and experience to offer a wealth of advice outside of the "formula " offering of  official dealerships . European Law also clearly dictates that you do not have to use a authorised dealership to maintain your warranty .
You should always get good service at an authorised dealership ( thats what Ducati UK are there to do  ) but  ( from what I've seen in the various Ducati forums ) it can be a bit " here is your bill sir now pay it like a good boy. "
Either way do not be scared to venture from the prescribed path of light. A local friendly set up ( a simple test , will they let you into the workshop to talk to the mechanic ? ) could well be the best way forward especially if you want a free cup of tea  and a fag ( outside ) but more importantly a personal service brought about simply by people who are into motorcycles rather than business.

Service Your Motorbike Properly & Live Part 1

Somewhat dire words maybe but ask any traffic cop especially the ones on 2 wheels and they will tell you that a poorly maintained motorcycle is far more dangerous to its owner than a car.
Let me explain
If you do not inspect and properly maintain / service you motorcycle there are many ways in which you could end up in pain physical and or financial

Lets start at the front and work slowly backwards

1. Front Tyre - obvious really but when did you last check the tyre pressure or for that nail that was slowly working its way in. A soft tyre on any corner is going to cause you unthinkable problems. A lack of tread may give you more grip in the dry ( probably a popular myth and I'm not going to test it ) but when you have just ploughed into something hard or even worse for that matter something soft at a zebra crossing the first thing Mr serious and his flashing light are going to look at is your tyres.

2. Wheel Rim - bent or buckled ? well this may not actually be a MoT failure ( I am blessed by the house of VOSA and have a card to prove it ) but if your running anything bigger than a sloped ( remember those ? ) this sort of damage is indicative of worse faults elsewhere and a general degree of abuse. If buying a bike this is a sign saying "walk away ". If you are inspecting or servicing your bike and find a bent rim repair is a must.

3. Wheel spindle - When did you last look at yours? Not normally an item to go wrong but is it secured properly ? Try removing it , is it corroded ? and whilst its removed what condition are the bearings in ?( corroded spindle may mean corroded bearings ) Is the bearing seal even working effectively ? Bearings tend to work well then even when dry and corroded  they function and then Mrs Calamity comes to call on your high speed rush home one night in the rain ( guess your wallet and mobile are in the office as well ) you know the rest. Modern bearings are sealed so not much you can do but they can be inspected and tested. They can last for decades or just a few years. Bearings are "inspected " as part of the MoT but must be " excessively worn " to fail . I will write further on what that means. Mechanical speedo drive ? let that run dry and you could be in for a new set up ( £80.00 ish for the sake of a few pence worth of grease )

4. Forks - twice this week I have had bikes in with leaking oil seals. Leaking sounds like a minor annoyance. Oil on your brakes and tyres ( which it where it ends up ) is very unwanted VERY indeed .
A slight misting is only a "advisory" but can get very bad very quick so keep an eye open at the first sign get them changed. Better still get them changed before they go , its cheaper in the end . Fork oil on any performance bike should be changed every 2 years anyhow so do the seals then as well. Best case scenario you will be in for a new set of pads and a degrease if you do not , worst case is not worth talking about but I will....... You will crash and it will only be a question of how bad.

5 Steering head bearings - the new tapered bearings with the dust seals are pretty bullet proof but again grease may be the word but it does not last for ever. Depending on mileage I would re grease every 5 years. If you have the front wheel off why not do the fork seals , if you have the forks out its not much more to do the head bearings.

This is getting a bit more involved than I thought so Ill issue part 2 tomorrow.

Riding in a group.. safely.. Tactics, technologies, strategies and start points.

Riding as part of a group is a great way to pass time; whether it’s a casual ride, a group trip down to the coast, or a full pre-planned tour!
As with all things, there are pros and cons when riding with a group.
As part of a group, you feel safer, and your road presence is greater. Cagers (drivers) are more likely to see/hear 5 motorcycles than just a single bike. Another advantage is that you know that you have always got somebody there in case you breakdown, or encounter an emergency of some sort. There are other advantages too, such as Danny carrying the cooler-box full of fresh meat for the BBQ (on his Hornet 600!), and in exchange I carry some of his luggage (I had panniers on my bike at the time).

However, if you happen to be riding in a group, going slightly faster than the stream of traffic, it can be perceived as a bunch of hooligans, racing! Or if the group is going too slow, you can have some rather irate car drivers, overtaking the whole group, putting yourself or another member of the convoy at danger.
When riding through motorways, or faster roads, the group should try to sit in a staggered position (two bikes per row) – it’s the safest and most effective – if it is nearing rush hour, pace through the traffic briskly, but not too quick, leaving ample time and space for the entire convoy to catch up (if it IS rush hour, stop, have a coffee, fag and a piss and get back on the road when it’s cleared up!).
When riding local roads and going through busier towns and cities, it can be very easy for the group to get split at a set of lights, or at a junction. Similar situations arise at the busy motorway junctions.

There are many ways to avoid getting split up, or lost – one of the most convenient and easiest (once you get the hang of it!) is the "drop-a-marker" method. It’s gotten many different names through the years – (ride with us someday, and we can demonstrate it if you wish!). Basically, the lead rider, and the “tailman” (the guy in the back, who stays in the back thoughout the ride) should both know the route, properly! The leader then places "drop markers" at certain points, which the tailman then picks up.

For example, at a left turn: The leader would point on the left, at a strategic spot, the second rider then stops there waiting for the tailman. That way, as everybody goes past, they know to turn left at that specific point - the drop marker waits for the tailman, and then the tailman then allows the drop-marker in front of him - this then ensures that the whole group has taken the same turn. It also helps if the tailman has a unique hi-vis on, or some sort of sticker on his bike or helmet.

This can then be extended; if say, A is the lead rider, and F is the tailman. The route is something like, turn left, and then further down take the 2nd exit on the roundabout. A would point out a suitable stopping spot for B. B then stops off, waiting for F, and now C is behind A. At the roundabout, A points out a suitable spot for C to stop to guide people, and now D is behind A. Meanwhile, B has just been picked up, and C is just about to be picked up. This then carries on, revolving, so everybody is a marker-point at least once.
People can then just opt-out from being markers by allowing other to overtake them, if they end up behind the lead rider!

Communication is also important - Make sure you either have a properly installed radio system (expensive!), or have agreed, before-hand, a set of hand-signals (free!). The picture below gives you a rough idea.

Also, be sure to find suitable stop-off points. Most fuel stations (apart from selling petrol) have toilet facilities and sell food and drinks (hot and cold!). Cafes, pubs and the like don't mind groups of bikers, so long as you're not TOO loud and not causing any problems. Also, parking one bike, is easier and less of a nuisance to others, than parking 7! Take others into consideration before parking.

More importantly, ensure that the start point is somewhere suitable, with good links to the bigger roads. Most motorcycle workshops wouldn't mind if you meet up at their premises, so long as you are respectful. They should let you use their tea and toilet facilities, and some may even allow you to use a tool or two for the last minute tweaks, oil level adjustments or tyre air pressures.

Over at Hertfordshire Superbike Centre, we encourage bikers to enjoy touring, and happily welcome bikers who are wanting to use our premises as a meeting point to start off them longer journeys, and sort out them last minute niggles with their machines.

2013 KTM 690 SMCR Review and Prices

The new model of 2013 KTM 690 SMCR has a color available to choices the white and black color design in the motorcycles. The  2013 KTM 690 SMCR sport bikes is powered by single-cylinder, 4-valves of OHC with 4-stroke and completed with roller rocker levers and balancer shaft, APTC anti-hopping clutch and 6-speed gearbox. The 2013 KTM 690 SMCR is actually dual-purpose bike which ready to accompany the rider on track and off-track. The 2013 KTM 690 SMCR specially designs the frame from chromium-molybdenum trellis frame with powder coated for the subframe, the self-support plastic tank makes a perfect addition to the entire chassis and frame system. 

With the 2013 KTM 690 SMCR has a powerful LC4 1-cylinder, 4-stroke engine with electronic fuel injection. The 2013 KTM 690 SMCR has a light steel trellis frame with innovative, die-cast swingarm and self-supporting polymer tail tank. The 2013 KTM 690 SMCR a new adjustable WP suspension with revised spring rates and optimised front/rear weight distribution for even greater agility. With the 2013 KTM 690 SMCR new continental sportAttack SM tires with outstanding grip. The 2013 KTM 690 SMCR has perfectly balanced layout with a self-supporting polymer tail tank ensures that skilled riders can sling the 690 SMC R effortlessly into any corner. The 2013 KTM 690 SMCR has a price of $6,899 USD. The 2013 KTM 690 SMCR has fully update the performance in running thought  the test which help to increse the speed of this motorcycles. With 2013 KTM 690 SMCR has fully takes the control in fast driving in the road.

2013 KTM 990 SMT Review and Prices

The new 2013 KTM 990 SMT have a color white and black color design in the motorcycles. The KTM 990 SMT has a powerful LC8 4-stroke V-Twin, electronic K eihin fuel injection with two throttle valves, balancer shaft, hydraulic multi-disc wet clutch, 6-speed gearbox. The 2013 KTM 990 SMT has powder coated trellis frame welded from chrome-molybdenum steel sections, black aluminium swingarm. And the 2013 KTM 990 SMT has radial Brembo four-pot front callipers on floating brake discs. The 2013 KTM 990 SMT has frame mounted fairing with windshield and integrated multi-functional cockpit. Also the 2013 KTM 990 SMT have a comfortable stepped seat, luggage carrying system and hand guards. 

The 2013 KTM 990 SMT with DOHC twice providing a choice between full-on energy for energetic throttle-twisting or enhanced energy to make success with convenience, amounting to 114 power and establishing the standard for free-revving twin babies. The 2013 KTM 990 SMT has a price of $13,999 USD. The 2013 KTM 990 SMT have a completely cushioned twin-level chair guarantees appropriate long-distance relaxation for both participant and pillion, while also providing independence of activity and crystal-clear in review a sportier speed. The 2013 KTM 990 SMT has a performance you can take the full speeds in travelling another places. With the 2013 KTM 990 SMT combines the power and speed of the performance of the motorcycles in driving. The 2013 KTM 990 SMT has update the performance in running to the road and takes the true power of the engine runs in the system of  KTM 990 SMT motorcycles.

2013 KTM 990 SMR Review and Prices

The new 2013 KTM 990 SMR has good sports bike which you can tell the powerfull engine drive in the road test. The 2013 KTM 990 SMR has a powerful LC8 4-stroke V-Twin, electronic Keihin fuel injection with two throttle valves, balancer shaft, hydraulic multi-disc wet clutch, 6-speed gearbox. The 2013 KTM 990 SMR the bike’s water-cooled V-engine which makes 114 power and a brilliant style concept with multi-function balancer base, two attributes that make it one of the least heavy and most stream-lined V2s in its category. The 2013 KTM 990 SMR is a tubular place shape which is made from thin walled chrome-molybdenum precious metal tube with a bolted-on, gentle aluminum subframe that only is 9.5 kg/21 lbs. 

And the 2013 KTM 990 SMR upside-down telescopic derive and the immediately attached absorber from WP Revocation allow the best possible personal modification of the framework for driving style, monitor, and fill. The 2013 KTM 990 SMR has a price of £9295. With the 2013 KTM 990 SMR has a radial Brembo monoblock four-pot front callipers on floating brake discs. The 2013 KTM 990 SMR takes the rigid, powder coated, chrome-molybdenum steel trellis frame with black aluminium swingarm.The 2013 KTM 990 SMR racing set-up as well as a highly sensitive response in taking the performance in running in the road. And 2013 KTM 990 SMR has cool body design model which you can see the unique color in another motorcycles in the another country.  With the performance of the 2013 KTM 990 SMR in driving, you can surely improve the unique process of the engine in the motorcycles in running to the another places you want to visit.

2013 KTM 990 Duke R Review and Prices

The new 2013 KTM 990 Duke R engine and high-performance Brembo brakes featuring monoblock radial-mount calipers as well as the fully-adjustable front and rear suspension systems. The 2013 KTM 990 Duke R combines a perfectly balanced chassis with a state of the art V2 engine to create a bike that exudes versatility and all-around awesomeness. The 2013 KTM 990 Duke R bike’s water-cooled V-engine that produces 114 horsepower and an intelligent design principle with multi-function balancer shaft, two qualities that make it one of the lightest and most compact V2s in its class. 

With the 2013 KTM 990 Duke R is a tubular space frame that’s made from thin-walled chrome-molybdenum steel tubing with a bolted-on, light alloy subframe that only weighs 9.5 kg/21 lbs. The 2013 KTM 990 Duke R has upside-down telescopic fork and the directly connected shock absorber from WP Suspension allow optimum individual adjustment of the chassis to suit riding style, track, and load. The 2013 KTM 990 Duke R has a price of $3,290 USD. The 2013 KTM 990 Duke R is powered by 2-cylinder, 4-stroke, spark-ignition engine, 75° V arrangement, liquid-cooled 999CC engine churns out peak power of 123.00 HP 89.8 kW, 4000 RPM and maximum torque of 100.00 Nm 10.2 kgf-m or 73.8 ft.lbs, 7000 RPM matted with 6-speed transmission fitted with 18.5 lit fuel tank. The 2013 KTM 990 Duke R has a powerfull engine can support running fast in travelling in another places. The 2013 KTM 990 Duke R has a LC8 4-stroke V-Twin, electronic Keihin fuel injection, multi-functional balancer shaft, 6-speed gearbox. And the 2013 KTM 990 Duke R with chrome-molybdenum steel trellis frame, coated orange, with bolt-on rear aluminium subframe and sharper, (R) series geometry.

2013 KTM 1190 RC8R Review and Prices

The 2013 KTM 1190 RC8R has available color like White/Orange and Black/Orange, both with orange wheels and frame in the body of motorcycles. The 2013 KTM 1190 RC8R has highly developed LC8 V-Twin with optimised crankshaft, carefully balanced flywheel masses and dual-plug ignition, max. output 175 PS, max. torque 127 Nm. And 2013 KTM 1190 RC8Rhave a perfectly tuned suspension in the body motorcycles. With 2013 KTM 1190 RC8R a rear linkage with eccentric bracket for ride height and anti-squat adjustment. 

The 2013 KTM 1190 RC8R radial Brembo four-pot monoblock callipers on reinforced 320 mm discs. And 2013 KTM 1190 RC8R a great OEM tires the first-rate Dunlop SportSmart. With a 2013 KTM 1190 RC8R control and riding position ergonomics with comprehensive adjustments. The 2013 KTM 1190 RC8R has a price of $16,499 USD. The 2013 KTM 1190 RC8R has a dual-plug ignition ensures a perfect combustion control, with the pleasant side effect of a high output, peaking at 175 hp and 127 Nm of torque. The 2013 KTM 1190 RC8R carefully tuned suspension ensures a composed and comfortable ride even on public roads.  The 2013 KTM 1190 RC8R boasts of an insanely powerful V2 twin-engine that produces a mighty output of 173 horsepower. With 2013 KTM 1190 RC8R bikes comes loaded with one of the most powerful V2 engines of our times and one of the best chassis in the world. The 2013 KTM 1190 RC8R features focuses on maximum power with predictable engine characteristics and spontaneous responsiveness with controllable throttle response.

New Rideouts!!

Quick Reminder for you all - There is a Rideout this Saturday - the 25th March - meet at Store at 9.00am for coffee, with a departure time of 9.30 for a blast around Cheshire...

And as a little Bonus! on Sunday 26th March - our New Sales Manager - Martin is heading off up to Devils Bridge - departing the store at 4.00pm, and returning around 7-8pm. So why not come along, say hello and meet Martin and enjoy some great roads.... ! All are welcome to attend - only proviso - if its raining we'll probably abandon the idea for this month.

Watch this space though, as we will have a packed itinerary of rideouts alternating across Saturdays, Sundays and mid week evening runs in the summer - all the details will be on here and also on our Facebook Page, Twitter - @DucatiStore (What do you mean you aren't following us!) and on the DOCGB forums

New Rideouts!!

Quick Reminder for you all - There is a Rideout this Saturday - the 25th March - meet at Store at 9.00am for coffee, with a departure time of 9.30 for a blast around Cheshire...

And as a little Bonus! on Sunday 26th March - our New Sales Manager - Martin is heading off up to Devils Bridge - departing the store at 4.00pm, and returning around 7-8pm. So why not come along, say hello and meet Martin and enjoy some great roads.... ! All are welcome to attend - only proviso - if its raining we'll probably abandon the idea for this month.

Watch this space though, as we will have a packed itinerary of rideouts alternating across Saturdays, Sundays and mid week evening runs in the summer - all the details will be on here and also on our Facebook Page, Twitter - @DucatiStore (What do you mean you aren't following us!) and on the DOCGB forums

Ducati 848,1098 & 1198 Oil Srvice

Most people think an oil service simply means changing the oil and filter which seems obvious enough. Not so long ago however an oil service meant exactly that ie your oil gets changed but not always  so if your having a oil service round your local shop carried out make sure you confirm the filter is changed as well. Personally I dont think the Ducati brand filters are any better than the premium brands and HI Flow do a filter with a nut on the end of it which can make removal a lot easier if Mr Ape hands put the last one on and believe me Mr Ape hands has been around a few shops as far as I can see.

WARNING

The Ducatis mentioned above ( and probably some others ) also have a strainer in the sump and this should also be removed and cleaned. It may not be a major calamity if the engine is and has been in good order and this is a smaller service but its there for a reason and if it is catching bits of something it could be a good indication of problems to come which may be cheaper to solve now.

PROBLEM

The covering plate which needs to be unbolted to expose the strainer is held on by 4 M6 mushroom headed bolts with about the most shallow Allen socket I have seem probably designed by Mr Monkey brain ( no relative of Mr Ape hands ). Unfortunately Mr Ape hands uncle must work in the assembly plant in sunny Bologna ( or is that Chinogna ) as these bolts are simply too big to be removed with the available purchase from the Allen head .

RESULT

Stripped socket head and no inspection of the strainer.

CURE

Bring your bike to me as I have a effective method of removing them . I then replace them with a more conventional Allen head.

2013 Triumph Tiger 800 Review and Prices

The 2013 Triumph Tiger 800 comes highly specified and delivers a unique experience for the adventure-minded rider. The 2013 Triumph Tiger 800 features a tough steel frame capable of carrying large amounts of luggage and coping with the rough and tumble of off-piste riding. The new 2013 Triumph Tiger 800 long-stroke has 800cc triple produces class-leading power and torque with super smooth delivery for precision riding on difficult terrain. With 2013 Triumph Tiger 800 had a twin 308mm discs are gripped by two-piston sliding caliper brakes for powerful and progressive stopping power. 

And 2013 Triumph Tiger 800 has an optional ABS system adds additional braking security and can be switched on and off by the rider. The 2013 Triumph Tiger 800 has a class-leading 19 litre fuel tank ensures infrequent stops for the Tiger 800 rider. With 2013 Triumph Tiger 800 inverted 43mm front forks are graced with twin 308mm floating brake discs and two-piston floating calipers. The 2013 Triumph Tiger 800 a rider seat has two settings as standard for 31.9in to 32.7in seat height. The 2013 Triumph Tiger 800 has a price of $10,999 MSRP. The 2013 Triumph Tiger 800 has a LCD multi-functional instrument pack with digital speedometer, trip computer, analogue tachometer, gear position indicator, fuel gauge, service indicator, TPMS ready, switchable ABS and clock. The 2013 Triumph Tiger 800 has a different color to choice a crystal white, phantom black and venom yellow, with the adoption of a graphite coloured in this year.

J. Cole - Nobody's Perfect featuring Miss Elliott

Nas - Nasty (Video)


This is not a new video but its a cool one. Nas will be performing in the SXSW 2012 along with many other artists, including from other genres of music. It will definitely be a great musical experience! If you don't have tickets then you should get some. More information on SXSW 2012 coming soon!

2013 Triumph Daytona 675R Review and Prices

The new 2013 Triumph Daytona 675R has a perfect sports bike to drive in the road which can take a full-power of speed. The 2013 Triumph Daytona 675R sports a distinctive new look with an all-new colour scheme, red subframe and race style carbon fibre parts. The 2013 Triumph Daytona 675R include a standard-fit quickshifter and a host of carbon fibre bodywork, including hugger, silencer heat shield and front mudguard. The standard 2013 Triumph Daytona 675R delivering 125PS at 12,600rpm with a class-leading 72Nm of torque making the Triumph engaging and flattering to ride quickly. 

The 2013 Triumph Daytona 675R sparkling Crystal White bodywork is contrasted with a race style black belly pan and distinctive red subframe. The 2013 Triumph Daytona 675R including an Arrow slip on silencer, race style CNC machined levers and single seat cowl. The 2013 Triumph Daytona 675R is composed on all surfaces, while top of the range brakes deliver eye popping stopping power. The 2013 Triumph Daytona 675R has a price of $13,999 CDN. The 2013 Triumph Daytona 675R comprehensive instrumentation includes a programmable gear change indicator, gear indicator and built in lap timer as standard, while a host of performance orientated accessories include a plug and play quickshifter, performance exhausts and even a full factory race kit. The 2013 Triumph Daytona 675R 308mm front brake discs and offer the ultimate stopping performance and brembo four-piston radial monoblock calipers proudly grip.

2013 Triumph Street Triple R Review and Prices

The 2013 Triumph Street Triple R has a cool body design in another motorcyles in town. The 2013 Triumph Street Triple R has add a new supersport specification suspension and brakes. With 2013 Triumph Street Triple R combine the system to improve the running speed of the Triumph Street Triple R. And 2013 Triumph Street Triple R with fully adjustable front and rear suspension with four-piston radial front calipers and radial master cylinde. The 2013 Triumph Street Triple R sublime handling and control are the stuff of legend. The 2013 Triumph Street Triple R are three stunning colour schemes: Diablo Red, Crystal White and a striking Phantom Black and gold combination.

The 2013 Triumph Street Triple R has a engine with liquid-cooled, 12 valve, DOHC, in-line 3-cylinder. And 2013 Triumph Street Triple R fuel Efficiency has 33 MPG City / 51 MPG Highway. The 2013 Triumph Street Triple R front Brakes has twin 308mm floating discs. Nissin 4-piston radial calipers. The 2013 Triumph Street Triple R out as a machine for riders who just live for the twisties. And 2013 Triumph Street Triple R supersport specification twin-piston radial brakes ensure the Street Triple R stops on demand. The 2013 Triumph Street Triple R has a price of $9,599 USD. The 2013 Triumph Street Triple R rear kayaba monoshock with piggy back reservoir adjustable for rebound and compression damping, 130mm rear wheel travel. The 2013 Triumph Street Triple R has instrument display/functions LCD multi-functional instrument pack with digital speedometer, trip computer, analogue tachometer, lap timer, gear position indicator and programmable gear change lights and clock.

2013 Triumph Speed Triple R Review and Prices

The 2013 Triumph Speed Triple R has a good engine to travel. The 2013 Triumph Speed Triple R choice of metallic Phantom Black and Crystal White color options are complemented with red colored subframe and detailing, as well as the iconic gold forks for sport bikes. The 2013 Triumph Speed Triple R lightweight five-spoke forged aluminum wheels from PVM are more than 3.7 lbs.lighter than those on the standard machine to deliver even more precise and agile handling. The 2013 Triumph Speed Triple R are top specification four-piston radial monoblock callipers from Brembo, the leading brand in MotoGP racing. 

The brakes and wheels offer a 5% increase in braking performance over the standard 2013 Triumph Speed Triple R. The 2013 Triumph Speed Triple R latest specification NIX30 43mm forks at the front, with a jewel like TTX36 unit at the rear. The 2013 Triumph Speed Triple R lightweight five-spoke forged aluminium wheels from PVM are over 1.7kg lighter than those on the standard machine, delivering even more precise and agile handling. The 2013 Triumph Speed Triple R has a price of $15,999 MSRP. The 2013 Triumph Speed Triple R is highly specified with a comprehensive instrumentation package that includes programmable gear shift lights, digital speedometer, lap timer, fuel gauge and trip computer alongside the large analogue tachometer, with a coded key immobilizer is fitted as standard. The 2013 Triumph Speed Triple R with outstanding composure and adjustability to suit a wide range of riding styles and road conditions.

2013 Triumph Daytona 675 Review and Prices

The 2013 Triumph Daytona 675 has a new design with a complete strong engine to take a fast run in the road. The 2013 Triumph Daytona 675 combination of outstanding handling and a storming three-cylinder engine that makes this unique bike something special. The 2013 Triumph Daytona 675 offers a truly exhilarating ride that will flatter and thrill in equal measures. The 2013 Triumph Daytona 675 has also proved successful in supersport racing around the world, winning national championships around the world. 

The 2013 Triumph Daytona 675 one of the most flattering sportsbikes to ride on both the road and track, and endowing it with an addictive soundtrack only a triple can provide. And 2013 Triumph Daytona 675 engine itself is an integral part of the overall design, with the stacked gearbox allowing for a very compact powerplant that contributes to one of the lightest and most balanced supersport bikes on the market. The 2013 Triumph Daytona 675 fully-adjustable 41mm inverted front forks and rear monoshock unit both benefit from sophisticated high and low speed damping control. The Triumph Daytona 675 style Jet Black bellypan, all complemented with new dark finishes to the footrest hangers and brake discs. The 2013 Triumph Daytona 675 has a price of $10,999 MSRP. The 2013 Triumph Daytona 675 phantom Black or Diablo Red colour options in viewing. With the 2013 Triumph Daytona 675 has unique body design in another motorcyles in the public market.

Wiz Khalifa- California (Music Video)



This is a new video by Wiz Khalifa off his new mixtape entitled Taylor Allerdice. The mixtape is named after his old High School. This is a cool lay-back song. The type of song that we have come to expect from Wiz and he delivers. Check out this video and get the mixtape.

2013 Yamaha FZ8 Review and Prices

The 2013 Yamaha FZ8 has a combining sports performance and agressive in styling with all day riding comfort in the motorcycles. The 2013 Yamaha FZ8 has 779cc engine combines top end components, including ceramic composite coated cylinders and forged aluminum pistons, with a carefully optimized crankshaft to deliver the perfect power curve and torquey performance character for this category. The 2013 Yamaha FZ8 with cast aluminum frame and Controlled-Fill aluminum swingarm is lightweight and provides the ideal rigidity balance for outstanding cornering performance. 

And the 2013 Yamaha FZ8 engine has been tuned to provide plenty of low to mid range torque with strong yet linear throttle response. The 2013 Yamaha FZ8 pistons, cylinder, cylinder head, cams, valves and crankshaft are unique to the FZ8. With 2013 Yamaha FZ8 has valve angle is set at 26 degrees to keep the combustion chamber compact. The 2013 Yamaha FZ8 fuel injection's lightweight Electronic Control Unit utilizes a powerful 32-bit processor for fast control of the injection process. The 2013 Yamaha FZ8 has 7.8 litre airbox features different intake funnel lengths for the inner 150mm and outer 125mm cylinders. The 2013 Yamaha FZ8 has a price of $8,690 MSRP. With 2013 Yamaha FZ8 dual 310mm front discs are squeezed by ultra rigid R6 inspired monoblock, 4-piston calipers which provide outstanding stopping power and feel. The 2013 Yamaha FZ8 rear wheel is a MT5.50-17 fitted with a 180/55-ZR17 radial tire.

2013 Yamaha FZ6R Review and Prices

The 2013 Yamaha FZ6R fits perfectly into the less intense sport bike world with its easy to control power, light weight and low seat height. The 2013 Yamaha FZ6R is a great combination of performance, handling, and exciting sport bike style, but also with a low seat height that’s both adjustable to fit a wider variety of riders and also narrower where it counts to make it even easier to put both feet on the ground. The new 2013 Yamaha FZ6R uses nothing less than quality radial tires, 120/70R 17-inch front and 160/60R 17-inch rear. 

And this 2013 Yamaha FZ6R bike’s excellent stopping performance is due to dual 298mm front discs and a 245mm rear disc, both with comfortable to use controls. The 2013 Yamaha FZ6R has an engine of ultra-compact, 600cc, liquid-cooled, DOHC, 16-valve, slant block in-line four powerplant. With 2013 Yamaha FZ6R compact, 4-valve cylinder head features 25mmm intake valves and 22mm exhaust valves. And 2013 Yamaha FZ6R has ceramic composite plated sleeveless cylinder bores provide greater heat dissipation for consistent power delivery and reduced frictional power losses. The 2013 Yamaha FZ6R has a price of $7,690 MSRP. The 2013 Yamaha FZ6R main frame tubes are 31.5mm in diameter and feature a minimum of welds and bends. And 2013 Yamaha FZ6R has a lightweight 5-spoke mag wheels are fitted with Z rated radial tires which reduce unsprung weight for light, agile handling.

2013 Yamaha YZF-R6 Review and Prices

 The 2013 Yamaha YZF-R6 is full of innovations and technology in the new generation of the motorcycles. The new 2013 Yamaha YZF-R6 has engine ultra-compact, lightweight, short stroke, 599cc, DOHC, 16-valve, liquid-cooled, in-line four-cylinder with lightweight titanium valves produces incredible horsepower.The 2013 Yamaha YZF-R6 intake valve angle is 11.5 degrees and the exhaust is 12.25 degress. The 2013 Yamaha YZF-R6 intake valves are 27mm in diameter while the exhaust valves are 23mm.

 The 2013 Yamaha YZF-R6 has high lift/high performance, hollow, side-driven camshafts provide arm stretching power and strong acceleration. With a 2013 Yamaha YZF-R6 close ratio 6-speed transmission delivers seamless power delivery and maximum acceleration.  The 2013 Yamaha YZF-R6 shift drum and shifting mechanism are located on the right side of the cases for smooth shifting feel under power. This 2013 Yamaha YZF-R6 clutch uses 9 paper based friction plates and 8 steel plates, plus 6 coil-type clutch springs. With a 2013 Yamaha YZF-R6 key chassis geometry figures include: 1380mm wheelbase, 24 degree caster angle, 97mm of trail and a 52.5% front and 47.5% rear weight balance. The 2013 Yamaha YZF-R6 has a price of $11,390 MSRP.
 

2013 Yamaha Fazer 8 Review and Prices

The 2013 Yamaha Fazer 8 featuring all the same great engine and chassis and a stylish 1/2 fairing the new motorcycles in the future. The 2013 Yamaha Fazer 8 is a mid class sport bike that excels in delivering fun each and every time you swing a leg over the seat.The 2013 Yamaha Fazer 8 has 779cc, DOHC, 16 valve 4-valves/cyl, liquid-cooled, 40 degree inclined, in-line four-cylinder engine. The 2013 Yamaha Fazer 8 engine has been tuned to provide plenty of low to mid range torque with strong yet linear throttle response and pistons, cylinder, cylinder head, cams, valves and crankshaft are unique to the Fazer 8.

The 2013 Yamaha Fazer 8 valve angle is set at 26 degrees to keep the combustion chamber compact. With the 2013 Yamaha Fazer 8 fuel injection lightweight Electronic Control Unit utilizes a powerful 32-bit processor for fast control of the injection process. The 2013 Yamaha Fazer 8 has a price of 1,000,000 MSRP. Specially the 2013 Yamaha Fazer 8 has designed 7.8 litre airbox features different intake funnel lengths for the inner 150mm and outer 125mm cylinders. The 2013 Yamaha Fazer 8 with a lightweight cast-aluminum 5-spoke wheels reduce unsprung weight for great handling characteristics. The 2013 Yamaha Fazer 8 features analog tachometer, digital speedometer, odometer, dual tripmeters, fuel gauge, fuel reserve tripmeter counts kilometres since the fuel went on reserve, clock, coolant temperature and a self diagnosis mode.

2013 Yamaha FZ1 Review and Prices

The 2013 Yamaha FZ1 has features state of the art engine and chassis designs in motorcycles. The 2013 Yamaha FZ1 has full power engine type machine in the road. The 2013 Yamaha FZ1 has ultra-lightweight 998cc, DOHC, 20-valve, liquid-cooled, 40 degree inclined, in-line four-cylinder engine. The 2013 Yamaha FZ1 has engine has been tuned to provide outstanding performance and excellent passing performance. 

The new 2013 Yamaha FZ1 engine is a stressed member of the chassis, allowing a lighter main frame design without sacrificing stability and light, agile handling qualities. The 2013 Yamaha FZ1 has specially designed 8.2-liter air box with intake air temperature sensor maximizes performance. With a  2013 Yamaha FZ1 fuel injection's lightweight Electronic Control Unit utilizes a powerful 32-bit processor for faster control of the injection process. The 2013 Yamaha FZ1 has a price of $10,590 USD. The 2013 Yamaha FZ1 system is fitted with two 3-way honeycomb catalyziers with an oxygen sensor to reduce harmful CO and HC exhaust emissions. This 2013 Yamaha FZ1 rad and fan design produces more airflow than conventional flat design rads to maintain optimum engine temperatures for consistent power output. The 2013 Yamaha FZ1 has develop the most unique design can in prove the motorcyles in the town.

2013 Suzuki GSR750 Review and Prices

The 2013 Suzuki GSR750 is ideal for cruising the streets or weekend blasts, as it combines a powerful engine and quality components, with strong angular lines across the whole machine. The 2013 Suzuki GSR750 features a 749cc, four-cylinder, fuel-injected DOHC engine resulting in broad powerband with loads of low-end torque and dynamic mid-range power. The 2013 Suzuki GSR750 suspension uses inverted front forks, a design developed in racing and mandatory for a serious, high-performance machine. 

The 2013 Suzuki GSR750 exhaust Tuning servo-controlled butterfly valve helps enhance torque, response and acceleration, especially at low to mid rpm range. The 2013 Suzuki GSR750 carefully sculpted bodywork with highlights including a vented front fender,molded mirrors, chiseled fuel tank, textured tank side panels, and an angular tail section with integrated LED taillight. The 2013 Suzuki GSR750 LCD display also includes a gear-position indicator,coolant temperature gauge, fuel gauge, selectable odometer dual-tripmeter fuel consumption meter and a clock. The 2013 Suzuki GSR750 has a price of £6,999 GBP. The 2013 Suzuki GSR750 frame design combines the advantages of a compact tubular girder streetbike frame and a twin-spar sportbike frame to deliver a dynamic ride. The 2013 Suzuki GSR750 dual front brakes with fully-floating 310mm discs and dual-piston calipers. The 2013 Suzuki GSR750 a compartment underneath the removable passenger seat can carry a U-shaped lock or can be used to store small items.  
.